Rhyme Scheme #AtoZChallenge

Rhyme Scheme What is it? Any rhyming poem will follow some form of rhyme scheme, whether this is an alternating rhyme scheme or a form of repeated couplets. The type of rhyme scheme depends on where and how often rhymes occur within the poem. A literary example: Unlike most of my other A to Z posts, there isn’t really a specific…

Pathetic Fallacy

Pathetic Fallacy What is it? The phrase “pathetic fallacy” refers to when a setting or a natural element mimics a character’s emotions or the mood of a poem. For example, if a character was angry, a storm might be taking place in the narrative of the poem. A Literary Example: “But when the melancholy fit shall…

Onomatopoeias #AtoZChallenge

Onomatopoeias What are they? An onomatopoeia occurs when the way that a word sounds imitates the word itself. Common examples are “bang”, “slither” and “whizz”. A Literary Example: “The moan of doves in immemorial elms, And murmuring of innumerable bees” –  “Come Down, O Maid” by Alfred Lord Tennyson. My Example: With a whizz and a pop, A crackle…

Negative Capability #AtoZChallenge

Negative Capability What is it? Negative capability is a philosophical concept, rather than a poetic device, but it is often promoted through poetry. It basically suggests that writers should accept that some problems should remain unsolved. This was commonly practised by John Keats, who argued that even certainties should be left open to the imagination. A…

Metonymy #AtoZChallenge

Metonymy What is it? Metonymy is a form of representative substitution. When a poet doesn’t want to directly name a specific object or establishment, they can refer to it by using another word that is commonly associated with it. A common example of this is the mention of “crown” representing monarchy and leadership. A Literary…

Litotes #AtoZChallenge

Litotes What is it? The word “litotes” refers to a form of poetic understatement. The opposite of hyperbole, this often involves double negatives to accentuate a positive. A good example of this is, “he’s not bad looking”. Litotes here understates the appearance of the man whilst also suggesting that he is attractive. A Literary Example:…

“The Shining”: Book Review

My long-term followers will now be very much aware that I am a self-professed lover of the gothic genre. From Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto to Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, I have enjoyed pretty much every gothic-style novel that I have picked up, yet, until recently, I had never read a single book by Stephen King….

Kennings #AtoZChallenge

Kennings What are they? A kenning is a type of metaphor often found in Old English. It is a way of describing a person or object in a two-word phrase that acts a little like a riddle. For example, if you were reading about a “word-fisher”, this would be a kenning that refers to a…

“The Good, Great Man”: Analysis

The Poem The Good, Great Man By Samuel Taylor Coleridge “How seldom, friend! a good great man inherits Honour or wealth with all his worth and pains! It sounds like stones from the land of spirits If any man obtain that which he merits Or any merit that which he obtains.“ REPLY TO THE ABOVE For…