An Endless Cycle

It’s a pretty tricky photo prompt from Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers this week… or, if not tricky, it’s certainly thought provoking! Thanks for reading and I hope you enjoy my little story.


Jade M. Wong.jpg
Credit: Jade M. Wong

It’s tragic, really. We’re in an endless cycle, yet nobody seems to care – not enough to do anything about it, anyway. They just smile as the pattern repeats itself, waving it along as time after time, we demonstrate just how cruel we are.

I gaze hard at the sculpture, my eyes blurring in and out of focus as I take in the deep red circles about where the arrows hit the porcelain waves. Everyone else moved on from this particular sculpture almost an hour ago, but I can’t seem to wrench my eyes from that red. It’s so deep, and so honest.

The endless cycle of brutality, I think to myself, as my eyes follow the circular waves. Humans fight; it’s in our nature. We drag children from their homes and shove weapons into the hands of every able-bodied man and woman. We butcher one another, all in the name of some law or deity.

Then, we regret it.

So why then do we do it all over again? Why don’t we listen?


Word Count: 174
Click the blue froggy for more stories!

If you’re looking for more prompt challenges, check out my Sunday Scrawl.

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24 Comments Add yours

  1. Iain Kelly says:

    Great interpretation of the sculpture. Why do we keep doing it, indeed? Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Emily says:

      Thanks, Iain! That’s the question

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Moon says:

    Powerful story!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Emily says:

      Thanks so much!

      Like

  3. Dewin Nefol says:

    Hey Emily,

    A fascinating sculpture, it appeals to me on many levels: the concept is sublime. What is the title of the piece of artwork?

    I greatly appreciated your discussion on the piece, the manner in which you foreground the futility of repeating cycles of brutality. At the centre of all conflict inciting suffering is ignorance, and often money, the two are symbiotic bedfellows for those who have an evil propensity towards the acquisition of wealth and power. Whereas people are fundamentally made the same – we all stand upright on two legs, breathe air, bleed if we are cut, and are all subject to gravity – it is our philosophical differences, our ideologies and ideals that remain entrenched and ingrained within mi9nd-sets nurtured from birth, and which serve to separate brother from brother sister from sister. So, how do you evolve an individual’s thinking? How does one educate without bias and allow an individual the freedom and opportunity to be who they are and believe in what they want to believe without coercion, threat, violence, intimidation, or brutality? How do we make life ‘fair’ for everyone?

    I read the piece as a comment on the continuance of self-inflicted human-suffering. There ar many perspectives to such an umbrella term, one could even suggest it is a political statement highlighting the suffering repeatedly inflicted on the populous by self-serving governments who fail miserbly to resolve poverty, pain, and despair. It is 2017 and humanity expects far, far more from us. Gaia expects far more from all her children.

    Thanks Emily, I feel better for commenting as I am sure you do as well 🙂 Hoping your day ends with a bang! Take care.

    Namaste 🙂

    DN

    Like

    1. Emily says:

      Hi, Dewin! Unfortunately, I’m not actually sure what this particular piece is called, as it’s not my picture! I’d love to find out, though.

      I’m so glad you liked the story! I completely agree – ignorance is probably the biggest criminal of them all, because people who do evil never actually think they’re doing evil – they think they’re doing the right thing. Of course, people are different and so they’re always going to have different opinions, but at the end of the day, surely it’s still ignorance? You pose some impossible questions there, Dewin; if only we knew the answers!

      Thanks so much for commenting; as always, I really appreciate your thoughts on such big issues!
      Have a good week!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dewin Nefol says:

        Hey Emily,

        Should you find out would you let me know, I was curious if this artist had produced any other work.

        Thank you for providing both image (a prompt) and personal reflection. Whilst you are reading Dickens I sense that your compassion takes your thoughts towards consideration of contemporary social issues. You are a kind soul Emily, you pen will always be your sword 🙂

        Thanks so much for blogging! I like to be entertained by what I read, your post was enjoyed thank you. Have a wonderful week!

        Namaste 🙂

        DN

        Like

  4. Very deep thoughts that this sculpture has caused and yes, so very true about war and fighting! Great story!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Emily says:

      Thank you so much – it’s hard not to write about the deep stuff with this picture! Thanks for hosting 🙂

      Like

      1. That is so true! This photo conjures up deep stuff!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. James says:

    It’s in our nature. Human history is replete with such events. I don’t see it changing anytime soon.

    Like

    1. Emily says:

      Unfortunately, neither do I! Thanks for reading, James.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Deep thoughts and interpretation makes this post interesting though it is poignant. The endless brutality continues and History repeats itself. and Man knowingly unknowingly passes this legacy of hate and destruction to the future generations. This has to stop. The innocent voices one day will ask the dead souls as why they have dug graves for their successors.

    https://ideasolsi65.blogspot.in/2017/08/interpretations.html

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Emily says:

      Very true. Thanks so much for the kind words 🙂

      Like

  7. Ellora says:

    This is a great piece! I especially liked your unique description of the blood being an ‘honest’ red – I’ve never heard that before, but it worked perfectly. Good job! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Emily says:

      Haha thanks, Ellora! Glad you liked it 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. michael1148humphris says:

    I liked your take on this weeks prompt – I wished that I had thought of this angle. Well done

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Emily says:

      Haha thanks, Michael! It took me a while to think of what to write, I must say

      Like

  9. Can we not break this vicious circle once and for all and set the humanity free? Can we not be that change to break away from the pattern? Can kindness and compassion be the keys to breaking away?
    Engaging read!
    – Anagha From Team MocktailMommies
    http://mocktailmommies.blogspot.in/2017/08/cold-blooded-murder.html

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Emily says:

      If only we knew how to break it! Thanks so much for taking the time to read, Anagha

      Like

  10. Fluid Phrase says:

    I agree with you, Emily. This is such an important topic for discussion and I love how you interpreted the sculpture and have woven it into the narrative. Well done indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Emily says:

      It really is; I’m glad you agree! Thanks for reading 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  11. afairymind says:

    That is definitely a sculpture that raises many thoughts and questions. I’ve often wondered the same things about the cycles of war and brutality. Unfortunately, humanity never seems them learn from he mistakes of the past. Very nicely done, Emily. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Emily says:

      It does seem a shame, doesn’t it? The outcome’s always brutal, but we never seem to realise. Thank you so much for reading and commenting 🙂

      Like

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